By Leah Mayor

Within the world of an increasingly localized food movement, we are ever more familiar with buying a peck of heirloom apples, serving up a pound of grass-fed beef, decorating with a bouquet of seasonal flowers, and adding a pinch or a dash of our local agricultural products to any meal. A number of groups, like Slow Food and Wholesome Wave have promoted food culture reform by helping communities recognize the importance of healthy, local food production to their on-going happiness, health, and well-being. Similarly, in line with national concerns, many organizations have begun to promote agriculture by increasing awareness of its impact on economic stability and international security. But even with a surge of interest in “local food” and its central relationship to individual, community and global health, somehow it remains difficult for many of us to make the connection between the food we eat and the land that is required to grow it.

Read more on the Huffington Post website.